Family, Home, & Social Sciences

Natalie Romeri-Lewis

Natalie Wright Romeri-Lewis, Senior Project Associate at The WomanStats Project, studied international development, refugees, and law.  She has explored judicial reform and women’s informal power in developing nations and lived in Asia, Europe, and Latin America.  She has worked in judicial chambers and NGOs and consulted internationally. While presenting to new staff at UN permanent missions, she explained how to improve the quality of the contributions and quantity of female negotiators.  Currently, she teaches international development at the Kennedy Center for International Studies at BYU and leads initiatives at The WomanStats Project.  She also researches urban poverty among Colombian women, women’s leadership during peace and transitional justice processes, and the voting patterns of legislatures with high numbers of females. 

In a new project, Natalie is reviewing studies and datasets on truth commissions to determine who incorporates the multiple identities of statement-makers into institutional design.  In the future, she plans on conducting field experiments in post-conflict Colombia.  In addition to randomized control trials, she aims to facilitate locals through socially innovative workshops to identify how they would design a truth commission – one that, according to them, would provide healing, empowerment, and justice outcomes.  Field activities would include drawing, ranking, sorting, prototyping, and testing.

Natalie invites all students to attend her semesterly workshops on community-building (FAMA technique) and professionalism and networking for future global professionals!

Research and Other Accomplishments

Natalie designed a new, practice-oriented class, “Women, Peace, Transitional Justice, and the Rule of Law.”  Students analyze the evolution of a post-conflict country of their choice from peace to conflict, conflict to peace, and peace to transitional justice.  Students learn to identify, analyze, and map their stakeholders and resources.  They also present a final project.  Projects last year included enhancing an anti-FGM campaign among Kurdish families and designing workshops for pre-teens on the meaning of consent in Liberia where post-conflict sexual violence remains high. 

Her research is in the area of the substantive representation of women in politics and whether countries experience reduced internal conflict, reduced external conflict, and increased domestic violence legal protections as numbers of female parliamentarians rise worldwide.  She also writes about women in urban poverty in Colombia and the the income-generation alternatives they have. Natalie is also starting a long-term study on the interaction between truth commissions and victim statement-makers with implications for future transitional justice programs in Colombia.  She hopes to first train law and political science students to facilitate (ACUMEN/IDEO-like) human-centered design workshops throughout cities and rural areas in Colombia to determine how individuals not-affiliated with government employment would design a truth commission.  The participants will discuss, rank, sort, draw, and prototype their ideal truth commission - one that aims to provide the outcomes of justice, healing, and empowerment.  These results will hopefully inform future truth commissioners and truth commission designers as they plan who provides statements, how to transport victims from rural areas to the commission, how statements are offered, the services offered to statement-makers during and following their written and/or oral statement-making, and so forth. Once Colombia has a peace agreement in place and looks to designing a truth commission, Natalie hopes to conduct randomized control trials leading up to the commission and while the commission operates.  Findings will potentially provide insight to future countries exiting conflict on which elements provide the highest amount of perceived healing, empowerment, and justice.   

Presentations

http://www.womenofthemountains.org/index.php/16-uncategorised/62-2015-wom-day-2

https://peaceandjusticeconference2016.org/agenda/

http://4ccn.weebly.com/2016–tempe-az.html

Women, Peace, Negotiations, and Data, Oct 2016

Women Have a Voice: How to Write for the Popular Press, Oct 2016

Research Awards

http://womensstudies.byu.edu/awards/

Publications

         Book Chapter

          ▪  Women Peacebuilders: How Women Influence Peace Processes and Why We Need More Data

              The History of Peace: 1750 Through the Present, Rutledge Press, June 2017

              http://historicaldialogues.org/2016/09/22/cfp-call-for-book-chapters-a-history-of-world-peace-deadline-october-1-2016/

        Book Review

          ▪  Sex and World Peace, Hudson et al.                                        

              Taylor and Francis, 2016, http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15512169.2015.1125689

Works in Progress

          ▪  Article: Female Representation and Domestic Violence Legislation: A Cross-National Study

             http://womensstudies.byu.edu/awards/

          ▪  Article: Female Representation and Peace and Security Outcomes: A Cross-National study

             http://womensstudies.byu.edu/awards/

          ▪  Article: Datasets on Women: Competing Methodologies

          ▪  Article: Intersectionality and Truth Commissions: Do institutional-designers, academics, and datasets        

           analyze the multiple identities of truth commission statement-makers?

          ▪  Book Chapter: Women in Urban Poverty in Colombia

          ▪  Law Review Article: Global Domestic Violence Laws: The Best and Worst National Coverage and How Countries Reduce Domestic Violence Without Fulling Banning It

 

Ryan Gabriel

Department: 

Growing up in Utah and California as a mixed-race individual, Dr. Ryan Gabriel was exposed to the subject of race frequently during his childhood. “The majority of my friends in Utah were white,” he said, “but I had non-white friends in California where my father lived. The juxtaposition of cultural environments set race at a sharp relief in my early consciousness.” As such, he was interested in racial dynamics from an early age. However, it wasn’t until college that he was exposed to them from a sociological perspective. “I was gripped,” he said. “Since then, all of my work, in one way or another, has traversed the geography of race and its enduring power to influence our lives.” And the Department of Sociology at Brigham Young University is the most recent to benefit from his expertise as he joins its faculty.

Gabriel, a recent graduate of the University of Washington, completed his PhD dissertation on the residential stratification of mixed-race couples.  His decision to come to the Y was about the school and its research. “I came to BYU to be a part of a great department,” he said. “We have faculty in sociology who are doing excellent work on important subjects. That was a strong attraction [for] me deciding to accept an appointment in the department.”

And while he’s only taught here a short time, Dr. Gabriel has already been heavily influenced by the students in his classes. “I have noticed [their] sincerity,” he said. “Many of them are truly interested in engaging in challenging questions and do so with alacrity. I find them inspiring.”

Currently, Dr. Gabriel is working on a few projects. Continuing the work of his dissertation, he is investigating residential mobility patterns in mixed-race couples. He is also working to understand how the most recent economic crisis changed the racial composition of neighborhoods. And, he is investigating the lynchings that occurred in the South between 1882 and 1930, and attempting to explain how they still have influence on contemporary white-on-black homicide in those same areas.

But as important as work is to Dr. Gabriel, family always comes first. “I have a beautiful wife, Erin,” he said. “She has taught me what it means to give and love. In his spare time, Dr. Gabriel enjoys watching and reading about basketball, cooking, baking, eating new and interesting foods, and spending quality time with his family.

And to any students wondering if sociology is right for them? Dr. Gabriel has one simple piece of advice: “Please, come, take my classes.”

 

Email Address: 

Stacey Shaw

Stacey Shaw is an assistant professor in the School of Social Work, teaching social policy, community organization, and human behavior in the social environment. She is also a part of the School of Social Work in the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences. Stacey received her PhD in social work from Columbia University and worked as a visiting professor at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, prior to coming to BYU. Her current research emphasizes wellbeing among refugee populations as well as the role of religion and spirituality among people who experience risks for HIV. She is interested in utilizing multimedia technologies and interdisciplinary approaches to understand and address social problems.

Email Address: 

Cartographic Desgn

BYU Course Code: 
GEOG 312
Course Description: 

Graphic perception, layout, typography, color, statistical methods, and symbolization of thematic maps through computer-aided techniques.

Professor: 
Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
GEOG 211 & GEOG 212.
Prerequisites Yes/No: 
Yes, there are prerequisites
CID Category: 
Design

Urban Design

BYU Course Code: 
GEOG 422
Course Description: 

Theories and principles of urban design emphasizing specific design criteria. Planning and design tools used within the U.S. by local government. Basic principles of architecture and landscape architecture. Field trips.

Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
None.
CID Category: 
Design

Hist of Interior Design+Arch 1

BYU Course Code: 
SFL 328
Course Description: 

History of interior design, architecture, and furnishings from ancient Egypt to beaux arts movement. French, English, and American design.

Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
None.
CID Category: 
Design

Designing Democracies and Dictatorships

BYU Course Code: 
POLI 343
Course Description: 

Studies the rich variety of political institutions around the world, in both developed and developing countries, democracies, and dictatorships, and their implications for policy decisions and political, social and economic outcomes such as political violence, economic development, and democratization.

Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
Poli 150 or 250.
Prerequisites Yes/No: 
Yes, there are prerequisites
CID Category: 
Creativity

Foundations of Anthr Theory

BYU Course Code: 
ANTHR 202
Course Description: 

Ideas from the founders of social and cultural anthropology and archaeology as disciplines, particularly at the turn of the 20th century.

Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
ANTHR 201.
Prerequisites Yes/No: 
Yes, there are prerequisites
CID Category: 
Creativity

Carol Ward

Department: 
Associate Professor at BYU since 1990 

Specialties include: Race and ethnic relations, minority education, applied social science research, ethnographic and survey methods

Carol Ward recieved her PhD at the University of Chicago.

 

Email Address: 

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