Physical & Mathematical Sciences

Software Design + Testing

BYU Course Code: 
C S 340
Course Description: 

Principles of software design, design patterns, design representation, refactoring. Principles of software quality assurance and testing. Development and testing tools.

Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
C S 240.
Prerequisites Yes/No: 
Yes, there are prerequisites
CID Category: 
Design

Operating Systems Design

BYU Course Code: 
C S 345
Course Description: 

Principles and concepts of operating systems design and the implementation of an operating system.

Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
C S 224 & C S 240.
Prerequisites Yes/No: 
Yes, there are prerequisites
CID Category: 
Design

Dsgn, Fabricatn, Sci Apparatus

BYU Course Code: 
PHSCS 240
Course Description: 

Machining, computer interfacing, controls, and vacuum systems.

Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
PHSCS 123 & PHSCS 145.
Prerequisites Yes/No: 
Yes, there are prerequisites
CID Category: 
Design

Advanced Animation Technology

BYU Course Code: 
CSANM 459R
Course Description: 

Meeting a variety of complex visual production demands by combining technical ingenuity with artistic creativity. Crafting directable tools with artistic flexibility and using them to create visuals for the production's story.

Professor: 
Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
None.
CID Category: 
Design

Seth Holladay

Department: 

Seth studied Animation and Computer Science in college, then jumped directly into an internship at Pixar Animation Studios. He spent over three years at Pixar, where his principle role was as an Effects Technical Director, creating environmental effects (dust, water, explosions, etc.) for Ratatouille, WALL-E, and Up.  Now he is teaching 3-D animation art classes, running a student game production project under the Center for Animation, and doing research in physical dynamics simulations for film and games.

Professor Holladay mentors students yearly on film and game projects. The most recent films produced are “Rams Horn” (Student Emmy recipient) and “Papa” (BAFTA Finalist).  The most recent games have been “Relic Hunter” (E3 College Competition Finalist) and “Vanguards” (published on Steam).

You can view these at “See Our Short Films” and “Play Our Games” links at animation.byu.edu

Email Address: 

Computational Creativity

BYU Course Code: 
CS 673
Course Description: 

Can we build computational systems that produce interesting/useful results through what must be attributable as creative means? If so, what does this mean? If not, why? Can these questions even be answered? This course will begin to address these questions. Our approach will be project-based, with the main goal of the course being to produce a working system to which we can attribute creativity. We will also incorporate a series of readings on various aspects of computational creativity, including theory, philosophy, empirical studies and implemented systems. The material is inherently inter-disciplinary and ill-defined. It will be intriguing and different and fun and challenging in a way that is likely unlike anything you’ve studied in CS to date. 

THIS COURE IS TEMPORARILY UNAVAILABLE

Professor: 
Department: 
Does the course meet general education requirements?: 
No
Prerequisites: 
Many
Prerequisites Yes/No: 
Yes, there are prerequisites
Focus Area: 
Technology
CID Category: 
Creativity

Jeffrey Humpherys

Department: 

Jeffrey Humpherys received his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Indiana University in 2002 and was an Arnold Ross Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University from 2002-2005, before joining the faculty at Brigham Young University in 2005. Since then, Jeff has won several grants from the National Science Foundation, including a CAREER award in 2009. He also received the Young Scholar Award from Brigham Young University in 2009. Since 1999, he has served as a technical and scientific consultant for several companies, particularly businesses specializing in information technology, financial services, healthcare, retail, and manufacturing.

Jeff has written papers in partial differential equations, operations research, applied probability, numerical analysis, healthcare analytics, control theory, and dynamical systems theory. 

In 2007, Jeff co-founded the Interdisciplinary Mentoring Program in Analysis, Computation, and Theory (IMPACT), which is a undergraduate mentoring program in mathematics and statistics that has mentored over 60 students to date in interdisciplinary research projects across the university.

 

Email Address: 

Chuck Knutson

Department: 

I have a radical theory that software is created by humans and that these humans function within social structures to create this software. Further, I hypothesize that these software creations significantly impact the social structures that they encounter in the world. Therefore, to understand the creation and impact of software, one must first understand people and their social structures within the context of technology.

Email Address: 

Pages